Alfred Hitchcock

Discussion and info on people in film, ranging from directors to actors to cinematographers to writers.

Moderator: DarkImbecile

Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
Mr Sausage
Not PETA approved
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#326 Post by Mr Sausage » Sat May 25, 2019 9:59 pm

I'm not a fan of Harry. Here's my brief reaction to it in the Hitchcock List thread.
I wrote:What a tedious movie. I suppose I can't blame Hitchcock as much as the script, tho' why he'd choose a script so hokey, unfunny, and full of hoary cliches (is there really a whole scene of people happening to wander by one random location in the woods all at the same time while an old man soliloquizes from behind a tree?) is beyond me. It's a narrative of endless scenes of uninteresting people talking archly at each other (sometimes in admittedly beautiful scenery). This vies with Topaz as my least favourite Hitchcock.

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#327 Post by domino harvey » Sat May 25, 2019 10:21 pm

bottled spider wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 9:46 pm
domino harvey wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:44 pm
ASMR for lonely Hitchcock fans (SFW, but you’re going to get weird looks regardless)
I almost fell off my chair laughing when she shushed me. And then she brings out... the popcorn. And we all know what she's going to do with it, don't we? That's right. Eat it. With her mouth open.

The script is unparalleled:
Oh you're so dreamy. So, so dreamy. I mean come on, straight from the fridge, all the girls love you. But you chose to go out on a date with me. Why?
That vibrates me. That vibrates me a lot.
.
.
.
I'm just glad this night didn't end with us screwed, blued, and tattooed.
So, what you're revealing is that you watched the whole thing

Image

I suspect she used Straight From the Fridge, Dad, a book of "hep slang," mostly influenced by or originating in black culture spanning from the twenties into the fifties, the majority of which was probably about as prevalent in actual day to day 50s life as "deck" or "fetch" was ten years ago. I used to use the book with my students for a fun daily vocab thing, though, and they loved it.

Honestly, if this video gets some preteen/teen fans of ASMR Darling to watch Rear Window (which, based on her comments, she does appear to at least have had on in the same room that she filmed this, despite the royalty-free music she overlaid), it will have served a greater purpose beyond allowing young people to engage in some mild fantasy dating roleplay. I also enjoyed the YT comment from a black viewer who expressed his inability to relax while watching as he knew a date with a white woman in the 50s wasn't going to go unnoticed!

User avatar
bottled spider
Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2009 2:59 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#328 Post by bottled spider » Sat May 25, 2019 10:47 pm

No, honest, I skipped ahead to the end to see how it finished... honestly...

But wait a second... how did YOU know that was the last line of the clip???

dda1996a
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:14 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#329 Post by dda1996a » Sun May 26, 2019 12:22 am

On the other hand, I was sure The Wrong Man was on course to becoming my favorite film of all time, not just Hitchcock's. I saw some people complaining on it's seriousness, but I found Hitch's themes being given the neo-realism once over, while also feeling like the sequel to Bresson's brilliant A Man Escaped had me floored. Fonda couldn't be a better casting, and I swear I could have watched their family life for another hour. But then goes full "end of Psycho" pop psychology, diverting the movie to the most unnecessary sub plot ever that I lost interest immediately. Just goes to show how sticking slavishly to real life facts could ruin a movie completely.

User avatar
dustybooks
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:52 am
Location: Wilmington, NC

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#330 Post by dustybooks » Sun Aug 11, 2019 11:12 am

Upon finally seeing the silent Blackmail and Mary (the German Murder!) through the new KL releases, I found myself a little underwhelmed -- somewhat predictably in the latter case, as Hitchcock himself outlined the problems with that film: it's terribly rushed, further obscures one of the main plot points that was already coded in euphemism in the English version (
SpoilerShow
Handel Fane is not gay or bisexual, as anyone watching the film today will assume and as Hitchcock agreed when talking about Murder!, nor is he a "half-caste," the actual given reason for the scandal in the familiar version of the film; he is, as stated in the very last moments, an escaped convict!
), and almost entirely drops the humor and characterization that gave the story flavor with the original cast, rendering it surprisingly generic and pointless apart from the sets and camera work. Alfred Abel is off-putting in the Herbert Marshall role, as you can imagine if you know both actors' work well.

It's conventional wisdom I know, including here, that Blackmail is far superior as a silent film. But perhaps because I've known and loved the talkie for so many years now, i couldn't help missing the narrative innovations. It's not that different in most respects, but it felt a little ponderous to me -- especially in the sequences with Calthrop as the blackmailer -- and unlike Lucas on the commentary, I didn't think the breakfast scene was nearly as effective without the "knife" trick, and I felt Cyril Ritchard was a bit less of a memorably eccentric horror without his weird piano routine. Chances are, though, that with my expectations tempered I will like the silent version more when I revisit, and I'm grateful to finally have it on the shelf, and glad I waited to be able to see it in its full BFI-restored glory.

Incidentally, I think I've now seen everything Hitchcock directed except the two Free French shorts, two of the three hour-long TV shows, and maybe some of his bits in Elstree Calling (a piece of which is on Youtube, but I'm not sure if that's all of his contribution). Oh, and The Mountain Eagle, Number 13 and An Elastic Affair, of course.

User avatar
DeprongMori
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 1:59 am
Location: San Francisco

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#331 Post by DeprongMori » Sun Aug 11, 2019 4:04 pm

Incidentally, I think I've now seen everything Hitchcock directed except the two Free French shorts...
The Eureka release of Lifeboat contains the two Free French shorts (with commentary).

User avatar
barnyard078
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 5:37 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#332 Post by barnyard078 » Sun Aug 11, 2019 6:26 pm

Image Entertainment also released the Free French shorts on an older DVD back in 1998. There are third party sellers on Amazon that are selling them, currently. The quality will be inferior to the Eureka Lifeboat release, but just putting it out there.

User avatar
dustybooks
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:52 am
Location: Wilmington, NC

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#333 Post by dustybooks » Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:16 pm

I appreciate it. The Eureka Lifeboat is on my list and I have access to the Image disc through the library, but I have to admit I've kind of delayed them because I don't want to be completely out of Hitchcock, as silly as it sounds. I finally watched "Incident at a Corner" last year and keep procrastinating on "Four O'Clock" and "I Saw the Whole Thing."

User avatar
senseabove
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:07 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#334 Post by senseabove » Thu May 28, 2020 5:43 pm

A UHD box of The Birds, Rear Window, Psycho, and Vertigo coming in France in September: https://4k-ultra-hd.fr/coffrets-blu-ray ... films.html
Last edited by senseabove on Thu May 28, 2020 6:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Glowingwabbit
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 1:27 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#335 Post by Glowingwabbit » Thu May 28, 2020 5:58 pm

senseabove wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 5:43 pm
A UHD box of North by Northwest, Rear Window, Psycho, and Vertigo coming in France in September: https://4k-ultra-hd.fr/coffrets-blu-ray ... films.html
The Birds is the 4th title... not North by Northwest

User avatar
senseabove
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:07 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#336 Post by senseabove » Thu May 28, 2020 6:01 pm

Oh, indeed! Whoops. I think I'd just read someone's comment complaining NxNW wasn't included when I went to type...

Glowingwabbit
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 1:27 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#337 Post by Glowingwabbit » Thu May 28, 2020 6:13 pm

Haha. No problem. I actually went looking because I was going to complain about The Birds not being included. I wonder why N×NW isn't in the set.

User avatar
EddieLarkin
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2012 10:25 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#338 Post by EddieLarkin » Thu May 28, 2020 6:22 pm

Unlike the other 4, it is not a Universal title.

This is essentially a UHD best of of the old 14 film Uni BD set.

Glowingwabbit
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 1:27 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#339 Post by Glowingwabbit » Thu May 28, 2020 6:28 pm

EddieLarkin wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 6:22 pm
Unlike the other 4, it is not a Universal title.

This is essentially a UHD best of of the old 14 film Uni BD set.
Oh I didn't realize it wasn't Universal. Thanks.

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#340 Post by domino harvey » Thu May 28, 2020 6:39 pm

Universal made a deal with Warners to include it in their Blu-Ray box, so easy mistake to make!

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#341 Post by domino harvey » Fri Sep 04, 2020 3:20 am

Wow, I never even heard of this, but in 1959 Hitchcock appeared on camera as himself in Tactic, a series of television specials about cancer, directing a scene of a doctor (William Shatner) telling his patient that she has cancer. Here’s the only circulating footage and more info here

User avatar
dustybooks
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:52 am
Location: Wilmington, NC

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#342 Post by dustybooks » Fri Sep 04, 2020 9:26 am

That's quite a find, I had never heard of it either. I'm a bit unclear on what's happening in the (remarkable) footage -- did the TV special actually incorporate the creation of the scene? If it's not staged, it's the only pre-1970 film of Hitchcock actually directing that I've ever seen!

User avatar
Roger Ryan
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:04 pm
Location: A Midland town spread and darkened into a city

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#343 Post by Roger Ryan » Sat Sep 05, 2020 2:41 pm

dustybooks wrote:
Fri Sep 04, 2020 9:26 am
That's quite a find, I had never heard of it either. I'm a bit unclear on what's happening in the (remarkable) footage -- did the TV special actually incorporate the creation of the scene? If it's not staged, it's the only pre-1970 film of Hitchcock actually directing that I've ever seen!
I'm pretty sure Hitchcock's direction is a staged part of the scene (note how the camera tracks to follow him - something that wouldn't have happened if this was spontaneous). Since the "impromptu" scene is so basic, it's likely that having the director make an appearance (and he would be a bigger name than either of the actors) was a deliberate addition to give the scene more dimension.

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#344 Post by domino harvey » Sat Sep 05, 2020 2:51 pm

There’s more info in the second link I posted:
The first section of the programme, which lasted about 12 minutes, featured Alfred Hitchcock talking about the subject of fear and supervising a short improvised scene with a doctor (played by William Shatner) and a patient (played by Diana Van der Vlis). The patient is a model who has been diagnosed with breast cancer but is initially scared of undergoing a mastectomy.[2]

Portions of Hitchcock's dialogue are reproduced in Hitchcock Lost and Found (2015):
First let me clear up one important point. In my opinion it is not fear that stops people doing what they should about cancer, it's the avoidance of fear. Fear is a perfectly normal response to a real threat. The best combat soldiers are those who know they are afraid and can handle their own emotions. I think that dread and horror and terror are all based on our attempt to avoid the experience of fear.

In Rope, for example, we have a rather charming scene in which a cocktail party is being held by two young men who have just strangled their companion. Drinks are being served from an antique chest, his temporary coffin. By all odds, these two murderers ought to be in a state of panic. The reality is that they are in danger of being placed inside another kind of furniture, that quaint piece of Chippendale with wiring by Thomas Edison, known as The Chair. But are they reacting with fear? Hardly. They're cold as custard. What might be normal fear now gives way to a feeling of horror. Now if I were to play the same scene with both young men in a crying sweat, there would be very little picture. In fact, both murderers would have realized their plight and boarded the nearest train for Outer Mongolia before the first reel was shot. And Rope would have been another travelogue.

At first I thought I might make a film about someone who suspects he has cancer and proceeds to torture himself in an attempt to avoid his own fear. Then I thought, I have to help put across an important idea. I have a limited time to develop the idea, and a limited time to demonstrate it. So instead of making a film I decided to stage an impromptu drama... Several weeks ago, I told the NBC property department that I would need one door, one desk, two chairs, a paper-knife — and a partridge in a pear tree. I also requested a young woman and a young man.

User avatar
jsteffe
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 9:00 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#345 Post by jsteffe » Wed Sep 09, 2020 2:21 pm

DVD Beaver has posted reviews and screen caps of Rear Window and Vertigo from The Alfred Hitchcock Classics Collection (4K UHD). I received the set too.

Vertigo looks very lush and saturated. (A bit too saturated, possibly)? I know that VistaVision can have a fine grain structure, but I still wonder whether the underlying restoration didn't end up removing too much grain in some shots. Individual shots can look overly processed, as they did on Blu-ray. That said, I am seeing details in the image that I haven't noticed before. (The same is true for Rear Window.)

My initial impression of The Birds is that it looks more solid here than it did on regular Blu-ray. Even on good 35mm prints the film looks uneven because of all the process work and special effects. The studio-based scenes look consistently better, based on what I have seen so far.

Visually, I can see the benefit of watching the UHD versions over the standard Blu-rays. The grading manages the overall tonal range better, and the highlights stand out while at the same time being precisely rendered.

A number of users have commented that the mono soundtrack for Psycho is not the original, but a downmix of the multitrack remix. It won't stop me from watching this version, but I thought you all might want a heads-up.

Lastly, a complaint about the packaging... All of the discs are jammed in tight book-style sleeves. You cannot take them out without getting fingerprints all over the discs, and you will have to clean them before putting them in the player. I have some spare paper CD sleeves, so I stuck the UHD discs inside those as a solution. Even with the paper sleeves added the inner book still fits into the outer cardboard sleeve OK, so I can keep everything together.

User avatar
senseabove
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:07 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#346 Post by senseabove » Wed Sep 09, 2020 4:03 pm

So happy to see that they've toned down Rear Window's unnaturally vibrant color scheme. It's always bothered me that the BD has such a neon-underlit color scheme that's nothing like what I've seen the many, many times I've seen it on film. I've read claims that it more closely matches the grading of IB Tech prints, which may be true, but it's just not fitting for the movie.

Now I'm just annoyed the new grading isn't ported to the BD, which is apparently just the same as the old BD we all have for all movies except Psycho. This and my aging projector might actually be a tipping point for me to start really looking into a 4k TV...

Post Reply