Passages

A subforum to discuss film culture and criticism both old and new, as well as memorializing public figures we've lost.
Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
Dr Amicus
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 10:20 am
Location: Guernsey

Re: Passages

#8026 Post by Dr Amicus » Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:20 am

Stephen Moore - Voice of Marvin in the radio and TV Hitchikers, many other TV, film and stage roles.

User avatar
Fiery Angel
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 1:59 pm

Re: Passages

#8027 Post by Fiery Angel » Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:25 pm


User avatar
Mr Sausage
Not PETA approved
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Passages

#8028 Post by Mr Sausage » Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:38 pm

Fiery Angel wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:25 pm
Harold Bloom
Damn. He was a formative influence back in my late teens. I see his flaws more clearly now, but his message, that we should read closely and deeply, and that literary quality trumps ideology, are values I hold even today.

That NY Times article was an irritating read. Its lack of fairness was unsurprising, but no less annoying for that. Far from someone who only liked to read white men, Bloom was one of the most searching and wide-ranging readers and accepted genius in whatever form it came. Precisely because literary quality was all that moved him, he was never prejudicial against race, gender, sexuality, religion, what have you. The article points out he never included Alice Walker in his lists of great authors, which just reminds me of Charlie Rose confronting him about the same thing only for Bloom to praise instead the terrific and lesser known African-American poet, Thylias Moss.

User avatar
fdm
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 1:25 pm

Re: Passages

#8029 Post by fdm » Mon Oct 14, 2019 7:42 pm


User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Passages

#8030 Post by domino harvey » Mon Oct 14, 2019 7:55 pm

Mr Sausage wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:38 pm
Fiery Angel wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:25 pm
Harold Bloom
Damn. He was a formative influence back in my late teens. I see his flaws more clearly now, but his message, that we should read closely and deeply, and that literary quality trumps ideology, are values I hold even today.

That NY Times article was an irritating read. Its lack of fairness was unsurprising, but no less annoying for that. Far from someone who only liked to read white men, Bloom was one of the most searching and wide-ranging readers and accepted genius in whatever form it came. Precisely because literary quality was all that moved him, he was never prejudicial against race, gender, sexuality, religion, what have you. The article points out he never included Alice Walker in his lists of great authors, which just reminds me of Charlie Rose confronting him about the same thing only for Bloom to praise instead the terrific and lesser known African-American poet, Thylias Moss.
He goes into his thoughts on the contentious stance in one of his Charlie Rose Show appearances and tries in vain to make it clear to his critics that as a social liberal he doesn’t object to the politics but to the artistry of a work being considered secondary to its politics. He’s clearly in the mode of anti-theory professors that still reside (perhaps in fewer numbers these days) in English departments around the world, and his stance is inflexible to a degree I don’t share, but his actual argument isn’t as outrageous as his detractors make it sound— he simply thought a lot of second class or worse modern literature was being bolstered, at the expense of outre “classics” that had stood the rest of time until recently, for reasons beyond their aesthetic worth. That’s debatable on a case by case basis, of course, but it’s far from the slander that gets ascribed to his views

I think Bloom’s passion and love of literature was admirable (and sometimes absurdly and embarrassingly florid), and as a figure who seemed always preoccupied in the last few decades with his own inevitable death in terms of his own focus on questions of the canon and why it matters, this is the kind of announcement that carries a particular weight

User avatar
Mr Sausage
Not PETA approved
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Passages

#8031 Post by Mr Sausage » Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:46 am

Funny to think of him as anti-theory (which he was, at least of continental theories) because he was himself so densely theoretical back in the 70s and was even associated with the Yale deconstructionists, for instance having an essay published in the book Deconstruction and Criticism alongside essays by Derrida and de Man. He claims never to've been a deconstructionist and that his own theories were, in his words, antithetical to theirs. I believe him. But he came to dislike both politically motivated theories and totalizing theories, turning against even his mentor and most profound influence, Northrop Frye, for flattening and homogenizing cultural traditions, in Bloom's view. But then Bloom's own influence theory could be rather totalizing. He was a complicated guy

I still admire his early theory of English poetry as a Romantic tradition (rather than the Romantics being a break from it), with the Romantics seeking a return to the poetry of imagination and energy represented by Milton and Spenser in order to continue the true tradition of English poetry, as they saw it. Their efforts bequeathed that same tradition onwards through Tennyson and Browning on down to modernists like Yeats, Eliot (despite his protests), Crane, and Stevens. I'm sure there are holes in the theory experts could pick at, but I do love the idea of Romanticisim as a primary poetic strain in tradition and not just a few navel gazing neo-pastoral poets that a lot of people mistakenly think.

I also admire his idea that Romantic poets are in fact anti-nature poets: that their initial poetry is in contest with nature, seeking to use the imaginative consciousness to overgo it and become primary. This project is doomed to fail, and by the end of their careers these poets manifest a melancholy sense of having failed in their projects (see: Shelley's Triumph of Life, Wordsworth's Peele Castle, and Keats' Fall of Hyperion).

User avatar
Cameron Swift
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2012 3:52 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta

Re: Passages

#8032 Post by Cameron Swift » Wed Oct 16, 2019 1:27 pm

I'm saddened to read of the death of Leah Bracknell today at the age of 55 from cancer. She was primarily (almost solely?) known for her 26 years on Emmerdale playing Zoe Tate, one of British soap's first lesbian characters, and crass as it may sound in an obituary post, I'll admit to having a bit of a crush on her as a teenager.

User avatar
mfunk9786
Under Chris' Protection
Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Passages

#8033 Post by mfunk9786 » Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:04 pm

27-year-old boxer Patrick Day, four days after sustaining head injuries in the ring that led to a coma

User avatar
ando
Bringing Out El Duende
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2004 6:53 pm
Location: New York City

Re: Passages

#8034 Post by ando » Thu Oct 17, 2019 12:06 am

Fiery Angel wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:25 pm
Harold Bloom
Respect. R.I.P.

User avatar
dadaistnun
Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2004 8:31 am

Re: Passages

#8035 Post by dadaistnun » Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:50 am


User avatar
FrauBlucher
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:28 pm
Location: Greenwich Village

Re: Passages

#8036 Post by FrauBlucher » Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:33 pm


User avatar
Feego
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:30 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Passages

#8037 Post by Feego » Fri Oct 18, 2019 7:59 pm

Julie Gibson, actress in Three Stooges shorts and probably best known by forum members as the woman who sings "Home to the Arms of Mother" in Hail the Conquering Hero. She was 106.

User avatar
mfunk9786
Under Chris' Protection
Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Passages

#8038 Post by mfunk9786 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:07 pm


User avatar
flyonthewall2983
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Indiana
Contact:

Re: Passages

#8039 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:22 pm

89, wow. I'd bet people started death pools on him when he was still in his 30's.

User avatar
Black Hat
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2011 5:34 pm
Location: NYC

Re: Passages

#8040 Post by Black Hat » Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:26 pm

This guy lived an absolutely incredible life and had a style all his own, the consummate "people are a lotta things" guy. The audiobook version of him reading The Kid Stays in the Picture is a must listen.

User avatar
hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Passages

#8041 Post by hearthesilence » Mon Oct 28, 2019 3:21 pm

I guess Coppola knew he was ill. When he screened the new restoration of The Cotton Club at the NYFF some weeks back, he singled out Evans (who wasn't there) and said he wanted to express his gratitude because he knew his kind words would make it back to Evans.

User avatar
Never Cursed
Such is life on board the Redoutable
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 12:22 am

Re: Passages

#8042 Post by Never Cursed » Wed Oct 30, 2019 1:09 am

Social media is saying John Witherspoon of the Friday films

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Passages

#8043 Post by domino harvey » Wed Oct 30, 2019 1:23 am

I remember him from the Wayans Brothers sitcom, he was a reliable crank

User avatar
bearcuborg
Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Philadelphia via Chicago

Re: Passages

#8044 Post by bearcuborg » Wed Oct 30, 2019 7:44 am

Everything about Friday is special, but John’s performance in particular seems to a favorite among most fans, for good reason. He also has a hilarious cameo in Boomerang.

User avatar
knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: Passages

#8045 Post by knives » Wed Oct 30, 2019 9:15 am

Not to forget a great late role as Grandpa in The Boondocks.

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Passages

#8046 Post by MichaelB » Mon Nov 04, 2019 11:25 am

I think we've already highlighted the internationally famous names (directors Ryszard Bugajski, Janusz Kondratiuk and Kazimierz Kutz, cinematographers Witold Sobociński and Jerzy Wójcik), but here's a list of everyone in the Polish film and TV industries who passed away between 1 November 2018 and 31 October 2019.

User avatar
Cameron Swift
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2012 3:52 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta

Re: Passages

#8047 Post by Cameron Swift » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:57 pm

Gay Byrne, a genuinely beloved TV and radio presenter in Ireland. He was host of the national broadcaster's flagship talk show for almost 40 years and did a great deal in modernising the country by bringing many previously taboo subjects to the fore.

User avatar
Aunt Peg
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2012 5:30 am

Re: Passages

#8048 Post by Aunt Peg » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:13 am

Omero Antonutti, best known as the stern father from Padre Padrone: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omero_Antonutti

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Passages

#8049 Post by MichaelB » Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:23 pm

Nik Powell, one of the major figures in independent British production over the last 40 years (he's best known for his partnership with Stephen Woolley at Palace in the 1980s) and more recently he was the head of Britain's National Film and Television School. It's not the slightest exaggeration to say that post-1980 British cinema would have looked very different without his input - he was one of the great behind-the-scenes string-pullers.

(An immediate example springs to mind: not merely making a film as ambitious as The Company of Wolves in the first place, since Palace had barely produced anything by then, but getting its premiere run at the flagship Odeon Leicester Square, almost unheard of for an independent film. Although of course hubris met nemesis shortly afterwards in the form of Absolute Beginners - but for all that film's many faults, you can't accuse it of lacking creative ambition.)

User avatar
mfunk9786
Under Chris' Protection
Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Passages

#8050 Post by mfunk9786 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:03 pm

Actor Charles Levin, found naked and partially eaten by vultures, with "no signs of external genitalia present."

Post Reply