Peter Bogdanovich

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DarkImbecile
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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#151 Post by DarkImbecile » Fri Feb 21, 2020 12:18 pm

That is some excellent work and a badass level of commitment, soundchaser! I assume we all can now just send you requests for other restoration jobs as needed, right?

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#152 Post by soundchaser » Fri Feb 21, 2020 12:28 pm

DarkImbecile wrote:
Fri Feb 21, 2020 12:18 pm
That is some excellent work and a badass level of commitment, soundchaser! I assume we all can now just send you requests for other restoration jobs as needed, right?
Thanks! I appreciate that it's been so warmly received -- I know it's not perfect, but it was a lot of fun even when it was frustrating. As to what that says about my commitment to doing other restoration work...I'll let you decide. :wink:

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#153 Post by barryconvex » Thu Feb 27, 2020 1:51 am

Thank you soundchaser for putting in the time and effort. Can you do anything about removing Burt Reynolds from the rest of the movie?

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#154 Post by soundchaser » Thu Feb 27, 2020 2:24 am

You jest, but some people would surely be thrilled that this print omits Cybill Shepherd’s opening number entirely...

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#155 Post by barryconvex » Thu Feb 27, 2020 3:42 am

Daisy Miller

From Bogdanovich's dvd introduction it seems pretty clear his heart wasn't totally in this one and it was more of an attempt to keep his old lady happy than anything else. It's not bad and I'd watch it again without reservation but it's a film that hinges on the lead and Shepherd's out of her depth here. The character's meant to be a shallow American, a carefree flower whose perceived uncouth manner and ignorance of class customs upsets the staid ex pat family one of her suitors belongs to, but unfortunately Shepherd interprets carefree as simplistic and plays Daisy as a one note dumbbell. Every line reading is delivered in the same breathless cadence and her attempts at coy playfulness seem neither coy or playful as she leads her two would be suitors around by the nose in a manner that feels more like Jaycee Farrow than Daisy Miller. Bogdanovich strangely omits several scenes leading up to the film's finale which consequently feels hurried and robbed of the impact it should've had. The costumes and locations are gorgeous, Leachman and Brennan are both excellent as usual, if a little underused, and if Shepherd's performance were as fully realized as Barry Brown's this could've been a great one.

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#156 Post by barryconvex » Thu Feb 27, 2020 4:01 am

soundchaser wrote:
Thu Feb 27, 2020 2:24 am
You jest, but some people would surely be thrilled that this print omits Cybill Shepherd’s opening number entirely...
That's really unfortunate, Shepherd is great in the movie. She can't sing but there's so much more to it than that. Harder to defend is her LP of Porter tunes from 1974 called Cybill Does It... ...To Cole Porter.

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#157 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Feb 27, 2020 9:01 am

barryconvex wrote:
Thu Feb 27, 2020 1:51 am
Thank you soundchaser for putting in the time and effort. Can you do anything about removing Burt Reynolds from the rest of the movie?
Whether you like him or not, you’re basically asking to take out at least half of the jokes!

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#158 Post by barryconvex » Fri Feb 28, 2020 1:11 am

I know, I know... I just couldn't resist getting one more lick in. I do like to take potshots at ol' Burt, God rest his virile soul, but I promise that was the last one.

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#159 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Feb 28, 2020 1:19 am

I’m curious to how you’d react to Starting Over if you haven’t already seen it, as it really is Burt in completely downplayed apathy mode that gives way to deadpan humor as well as honest drama in depicting the behavior of the emotionally confused as numbed. It may sway you a bit from his louder perfs, or at the very least surprise (and the two female perfs are so great you can’t lose)

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#160 Post by barryconvex » Tue Mar 03, 2020 2:44 am

I'm pretty sure I watched Starting Over years ago but I don't remember anything about it if I did. Funnily enough I've come here today to praise Burt for his work in Nickelodeon which I think worked so well for me partly because he had Ryan O'Neal as a foil in a great many of his scenes. It's not just O'Neal though, I genuinely liked Reynolds approach in this one as it differed from his usual take on boorish- something which he usually handled with overbearing arrogance coupled with a healthy dose of oily smarm should his character have a love interest, but here he ditches his usual schtick and goes for sweet and dim with a brilliantly effective southern accent that grounds his character when his ego becomes over inflated after the first act.

I loved the movie as a whole even if I missed seeing Shepherd in a role that she would've been perfect for. I've read a couple of reviews now (including Ebert's original from 1976) dismissing the work of Ryan O'Neal. Am I missing something? I thought he was truly inspired here, giving one of his greatest performances, the very heart of the movie. The entire sequence after he arrives by train to the desolate prairie town and ends up joining the film crew while discovering his talent for directing is one of the best of Bogdanovich's career and O'Neal is the engine for it.

Nobody could walk the tightrope of nostalgia as deftly as Bogdanovich did during his career peak and the back to back triumphs of this and At Long Last Love are so effective because he keeps the mood light and away from slushy mawkishness, writing sentimentality into his characters' natures as one of their many aspects which allows it to come across naturally, as if it were something inherent in the DNA of both films. Period costumes and other details only fill in part of the picture, he cast great actors and got great performances out of them and Reynolds work here is a perfect example.

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#161 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Mar 03, 2020 9:24 am

I can understand criticisms of Ryan O’Neal, but I think he’s just been used tremendously well in several films. His range is limited insofar as he can demonstrate emotion but naturally comes off as desperate and childlike, which risks this emotion being read as inauthentic. So his best roles capitalize on this very quality. In What’s Up, Doc? he’s a screwball type allowing for him to flounder in an exaggerated archetype, in Nickelodeon he plays another half-screwball, half-director ‘stand in’ caricature embodying immature narcissism and genuine star struck innocence/ignorance, and in Paper Moon (probably his best “acting” job) he literally plays a con artist who is inauthentic as a career so his personality bleeds between real and manipulative scenes well and highlights how ill-equipped and selfish he is in handling life. Barry Lyndon is even more of an obvious usage as the character is meant to be solipsistically unaware and thin in wearing a weak mask of fake emotionality that breaks as soon as he gets anything worthwhile or is threatened in the slightest way. Personally I like him a lot, but part of that is due to the roles he’s been molded, or molded himself, into!

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#162 Post by domino harvey » Tue Mar 03, 2020 9:31 am

I showed Nickelodeon every year in my film studies class and it never failed to be one of my students’ favorite films. One student’s mom told me how he even picked it to be the big family movie watching event at their Christmas that year

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#163 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Mar 03, 2020 10:42 am

The 70s project is a long way's off but looking at my own current list, four Bogdanovich films are in the top twenty, and could easily all sneak into the top ten depending on how optimistic my mindset is during the polling! He is the MVP of that decade for me, and his best film isn't even in it.

This is as good a time as any to mention that Nickelodeon, while not having a great stateside release, has a good R2 DVD that I bought on eBay for ~$6 a few months ago (and see currently listings around that price for a sealed copy). Unfortunately it appears to no longer be available to stream for free on amazon prime though. I slept on this one for years after struggling to look in the right places and couldn't recommend it highly enough for fans of the director. For someone who made at least five perfect films, rankings become arbitrary but this one is close enough to my heart to edge itself into the third spot some days.. (and the first two are in my all time top ten)

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#164 Post by domino harvey » Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:32 am

There was a stateside double feature with Last Picture Show that had two versions of Nickelodeon— the original color and the revisionist black and white version with two additional scenes (that don’t add much). Before that came out I had the UK disc though and can recommend

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#165 Post by swo17 » Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:35 am

That's this version. If I already have this, is it worth getting the UK edition?

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#166 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:36 am

I was aware of that stateside release but didn't think it had the color version too - or the additional scenes. Too bad they aren't worthwhile.

When is someone going to release At Long Last Love again on blu-ray? The current OOP edition is going for The Third Man prices by third-party sellers for god's sake

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#167 Post by domino harvey » Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:37 am

The UK version is the same as the color version on the Sony R1 disc, no reason to pick it up if you already have it. The black and white version is a one and done viewing experience, but I’ve returned to the color version for teaching and can confirm it’s on there

The extra scenes are an additional scene of Stella Stevens’ romantic frustration that better sets up her final choice in the film, and a pie fight

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#168 Post by jazzo » Fri Mar 13, 2020 3:34 pm

Looks like Paper Moon, Targets and Last Picture Show have been added to the Criterion Channel. Or maybe they were already there (I don't actually subscribe to the channel). In either case, does this bode well for Criterion editions of Paper Moon and Targets, and maybe a new deluxe edition of Last Picture Show (with Texasville's director's cut, of course)?

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#169 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Mar 13, 2020 3:43 pm

I've been surprised at how long they've waited on The Last Picture Show after annual reissues of singles from the set back to back years. Seems like an easy release to manufacture using the same material, so maybe it'll be an upgrade? But I doubt it. Paper Moon has been on the shortlist of "Why has nobody in the states put this out on blu-ray yet?" for a while now, it's pretty mindboggling.

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#170 Post by barryconvex » Wed Mar 18, 2020 8:45 am

Texasville is the one I'm most looking forward to revisiting, my lone viewing was at least 25 years ago around the time I first saw Last Picture Show. After revisiting Paper Moon and finally watching What's Up, Doc for the first time my estimation of Ryan O'Neal has expanded even further. His range isn't huge but give him a (semi) comedic role and he's like a duck in water.

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Peter Bogdanovich

#171 Post by jazzo » Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:32 am

Absolutely. And I’ve never seen the laserdisc director’s cut, only the DVD theatrical version. I figure if I just keep posting in this forum like Criterion is actually releasing this thing, eventually they’ll have no choice but to do so.

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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#172 Post by therewillbeblus » Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:52 am

If you are able to track it down, I'd highly suggest Illegally Yours (I found it somewhere on the internet streaming for free, after some digging, but don't remember where). Rob Lowe does his John Ritter/Ryan O'Neal screwball-Bogdanovich impression and nails it pretty well. Also, probably more in tone with Texasville, I'm finding that The Thing Called Love is only growing on me as I reflect on it, especially as the film appears to be Bogdanovich finally having recovered to a place where he can therapeutically face his past shedding some defenses, recalling TAL from a more clinically reserved space. In some ways it's his most tragic film because he's reaching out for and able to see this magical perspective from the past and yet cannot bring himself to grasp it with the same subjective alignment of optimism. On a broader scale this mirrors how nostalgia works for many of us as we grow and pine for that past mental state and young attitude on our way to self-actualization, so it becomes a reference for a stage of universal therapy as well as specific to Bogdanovich's own life path.

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